Frank Newport
Author Biography

Frank Newport

Editor-in-Chief

Frank Newport, Gallup's Editor in Chief, is one of the nation's leading public opinion analysts. He is the author of God Is Alive and Well: The Future of Religion in America and Polling Matters: Why Leaders Must Listen to the Wisdom of the People. He is a coauthor of Winning the White House 2008: The Gallup Poll, Public Opinion, and the Presidency and The Evangelical Voter: Religion and Politics in America. His analysis appears regularly on Gallup.com and in the media.

Blog: Polling Matters

by Robert Bird and Frank Newport

White Americans became less racially resentful during the Obama years compared with the years before he took office. This change was evident among independents and Democrats, but not among Republicans.

by Frank Newport and Julie Ray

Gallup editors put President Donald Trump's trip to the Middle East and Europe in the context of public opinion in the U.S. and in the places he will be visiting.

About one in four American workers say it is likely that their job will be eliminated by new technology, automation, artificial intelligence or robots within the next 20 years.

by Robert Bird and Frank Newport

Republican workers living in Democratic areas are more likely than those living elsewhere to say their work is affected by politics.

by Frank Newport

Donald Trump's policy proposals and actions over his first 100 days in office have a mixed relationship to American public opinion.

by Frank Newport

The American public has little interest in building a wall along the southern U.S. border and rates it one of the least important things the president could do at this point.

by Ella Washington and Frank Newport

The majority of workers say their companies have communicated about diversity and inclusion issues since the November election.

by Frank Newport

President Donald Trump's job approval rating fell to 36% over the weekend after Republicans' failed effort Friday to repeal and replace Obamacare.

by Frank Newport

Highly religious Americans give Donald Trump higher job approval ratings than those who are not religious -- an expected pattern, given the relationship between religiosity and partisanship in politics today.

by Frank Newport and Alyssa Davis

Following expected patterns, President Trump's 31% approval rating among American Jews is 11 points lower than his approval rating overall.