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Jim Harter
Author Biography

Jim Harter

Chief Scientist, Workplace Management and Wellbeing

Jim Harter, Ph.D., is Chief Scientist of Workplace Management and Well-Being for Gallup's workplace management practice. He is a coauthor of the New York Times bestseller 12: The Elements of Great Managing and the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller, Wellbeing: The Five Essential Elements. His research is featured in First, Break All the Rules, and he contributed the foreword to Gallup's new edition of this groundbreaking bestseller.

Dr. Harter is the primary researcher and author of the first large-scale, multi-organization study to investigate the relationships between work-unit employee engagement and business results. Updated periodically, this study currently covers 82,000 business units and includes 1.8 million employees in 230 organizations, across 49 industries and in 73 countries. His work has appeared in many publications, including the Harvard Business Review, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company and TIME Magazine, and in academic articles and book chapters.

by Jim Harter

Two forces have disrupted what is traditionally called "performance management" -- changing it to "performance development."

by Ed O'Boyle and Jim Harter

Winners of Gallup's Great Workplace Award, now in its 11th year, achieve performance excellence through their cultures of engagement.

Merely measuring workers' contentment and catering to their wants often fails to improve business outcomes.

The more that employees believe the job market is opening up, the less likely they may be to stay in their current jobs.

The U.S. job market is a mixed picture for workers: Some find it bleak, while others are confident and ready to look for new jobs.

One in three U.S. employees are engaged at work. Alabama has the highest percentage of engaged workers, at 37%, followed closely by Delaware, Kentucky and Louisiana, at 36%.

Gallup's latest meta-analysis on the relationship between team engagement and performance covers more than 82,000 teams globally.

Gallup research reveals leadership strengths most highly correlated with likelihood to vote for president are: inspiring, caring about individuals, visionary and courageous -- traits on which remaining candidates are rated poorly.

U.S. adults have well-defined images of the four major presidential candidates across 12 key leadership dimensions. They give the candidates, as a group, the most credit for being competitive, intense, focused and enthusiastic.

Truly engaged workplaces are rare. Just 13% of employees are engaged in their jobs worldwide. But there are companies that buck this trend.

Diversity is an important issue in hiring, especially in Silicon Valley. But various Gallup studies have examined the combination of diversity, employee engagement and inclusion that provides a competitive advantage for businesses.

Workplace policies and benefits alone are insufficient to improve health outcomes. Employers should also focus on improving the work environment.

Twitter's internal analysis recently concluded that its CEO was the "primary driver of engagement" at the company. Is this true for businesses in general?

Businesses could add up to 59% more growth in revenue per employee by combining four human capital strategies.

Performance fluctuates widely in most companies because there's such inconsistency in how people are managed.

Truly engaged workplaces are rare. Gallup research shows that worldwide, just 13% of employees are engaged in their jobs -- they are involved in, enthusiastic about and committed to their work and workplace.

At some point in their career, one in two employees left their job to get away from their manager to improve their overall life.