Politics

Gallup Daily: Clinton and Obama Remain Tied at 47%

Clinton remains slightly ahead of McCain in general election

PRINCETON, NJ -- Gallup Poll Daily tracking finds that national Democratic voters' preferences for their party's nomination remain evenly split, with Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton each receiving 47% support.

These results, based on April 24-26 polling, are the second report in which all interviews have been conducted after Clinton's Tuesday Pennsylvania primary win, and suggest that Democratic voters are -- for the moment at least -- divided right down the middle as to which candidate they most want to represent their party in November's general election. Obama led the race for a number of days prior to Pennsylvania. Clinton has now erased his lead, but so far has not been able to translate her primary win -- and the subsequent media coverage of her "never say die" campaigning -- into a lead of her own. The close nature of the race at this point gives even more importance to the outcome of the North Carolina and Indiana primaries on May 6. (To view the complete trend since Jan. 3, 2008, click here).

Clinton maintains her slight 47% to 44% advantage over John McCain in general election preferences among national registered voters in the latest April 22-26 results. Obama and McCain are tied at 45% each. -- Frank Newport

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Survey Methods

For the Gallup Poll Daily tracking survey, Gallup is interviewing no fewer than 1,000 U.S. adults nationwide each day during 2008.

The Democratic nomination results are based on combined data from April 24-26, 2008. For results based on this sample of 1,240 Democratic and Democratic-leaning voters, the maximum margin of sampling error is ±3 percentage points.

The general election results are based on combined data from April 22-26, 2008. For results based on this sample of 4,383 registered voters, the maximum margin of sampling error is ±2 percentage points.

In addition to sampling error, question wording and practical difficulties in conducting surveys can introduce error or bias into the findings of public opinion polls.

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