Gallup 2016 Global Great Jobs Report

Many employees with good jobs in every country are not engaged at work, and they are less likely to be productive.

Every person in the world wants a good job. But many people don't have one.

Based on data from more than 130 countries, Gallup's 2016 Global Great Jobs Report reveals that 26% of the world's adult population has a good job. That is, they work 30 or more hours a week and receive a paycheck from an employer.

In almost every country polled, significantly more adults with these good jobs are not engaged at work than engaged at work. In other words, millions of employed adults are psychologically and emotionally disconnected from their workplace and are less likely to be productive.

26%

of the world’s adult population has a good job;

4%

has a great job.

Adults with a good job:

43%

Northern America

35%

Europe

25%

Asia

Adults with a great job:

11%

Northern America

4%

Europe

2%

Asia

Across most of the world, the percentage of adults with great jobs rarely tops

10%.

Gallup’s 2016 Global Great Jobs Report provides leaders and decision‐makers with a global picture of the jobs situation through informative analysis of employment and employee engagement data from more than 130 countries.

Gallup World Poll

Download this report to learn:

  • How much do employment and employee engagement affect well‐being?
  • Which countries have the highest or lowest percentage of adults with good jobs?
  • Which countries have the highest or lowest percentage of adults with great jobs?
  • Which regions have the highest or lowest percentage of adults with good jobs?
  • Which areas of the world have the highest or lowest percentage of adults with good jobs who are engaged at work?

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