When companies consistently talk about strengths concepts, employees use their strengths more often.

Organizations need to do more to make leadership a reality for women who have the talent and ambition to fill those roles.

The best companies make a strategic choice to engage customers or satisfy them -- or both.

Malaysian banks are doomed to stagnant growth if they fail to appeal to millennial consumers.

Income is important, but women want more out of a job. They'll shop around for a role that best fits them and their lives.

U.S. investors say low interest rates (63%) are better than high interest rates (33%) when asked which would be better for their financial situation today, according to the Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index.

The Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index climbed to +79 in the third quarter, its highest point in more than nine years. A more positive outlook for the stock market provided the main impetus for the gains.

Banks in Thailand are struggling to engage customers -- especially millennials -- amid rapid economic and technological changes.

When it comes to getting the most out of employees' strengths and unlocking their potential, managers play an essential role.

One factor has the greatest influence on women's decision to stay in the workforce or leave: children.

45% of female employees want to become a senior manager or leader

Americans' daily self-reports of spending averaged $91 in September, the highest for the month since 2008. The average was unchanged from August, the first time in seven years monthly spending did not fall at least slightly in September.

When leaders make strengths-based development a priority, their companies make larger, faster strides toward strengths outcomes.