Business

What do workers want most in a job and a company? The answer can help companies improve attraction and recruitment strategies.

Companies can recognize talent, but it's nearly impossible to maintain a flawless hiring record -- yet some businesses get close.

by Robert Bird and Frank Newport

Household income and education are strong predictors of Americans' views of what social class they are in, although the terms "lower class" and "upper class" are infrequently used regardless of income or education.

by Jonathan Rothwell

Globalization has become a scapegoat for rising inequality and weak economic performance, but the evidence for this is weaker than commonly believed.

The more that employees believe the job market is opening up, the less likely they may be to stay in their current jobs.

The U.S. job market is a mixed picture for workers: Some find it bleak, while others are confident and ready to look for new jobs.

One in three U.S. employees are engaged at work. Alabama has the highest percentage of engaged workers, at 37%, followed closely by Delaware, Kentucky and Louisiana, at 36%.

Why is there a "talent shortage" when millions of Americans are looking for good jobs? It's time to change how companies hire.

Changes affecting organizations are coming relentlessly. They're overlapping and colliding in ways they haven't before.

51% of employees are actively looking for a new job or watching for new job openings.

For every one fully engaged banking customer in Mexico, another three are indifferent or disengaged.

If people with ideas move from consumers to "builders," economies globally can reverse negative economic trends.

Seeking meaningful and productive lives, "builders" in cities throughout the world could revitalize stagnant economies.

Stagnant economies around the world could be revived by a new class of entrepreneurs, or -- more broadly -- of "builders."