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Business

Americans' impressions of six major sectors of the U.S. economy grew significantly more positive this year. Others improved slightly, while none lost ground.

Opinion
by Larry Emond

Some companies have massively boosted their number of engaged employees, while others have not. Find out what makes the difference.

Employed Americans are not particularly worried about their jobs becoming obsolete because of technology. They worry most about having their benefits cut.

Fewer than one in 10 Americans routinely shop for groceries online, whereas the vast majority shop weekly at grocery and other retail stores.

by Annamarie Mann

Employees who work remotely 100% of the time report the lowest levels of engagement. Find out what you can do about it.

U.S. homeownership rates are down eight percentage points since 2009, with declines evident among most major demographic groups except older Americans.

by V. Lance Tarrance

While skeptics have a point in doubting tax reform can happen this year, the president, and now Paul Ryan, insist it will. Public support for middle-class tax relief, particularly from the GOP rank and file, works in reform's favor.

by Annamarie Mann

Open office floor plans are effective when they keep in mind human nature and employees' needs.

by Jim Clifton

What the whole world wants is a good job, and we are failing to deliver it.

Recent research has uncovered workplace trends that demand leaders' focus and innovative strategies sooner rather than later.

U.S. investors are gaining confidence that they will be able to maintain the lifestyle they want throughout their retirement.

U.S. workers are much more positive about company leaders' moral values than they are about those of the nation generally.