Jobs

by Julie Ray

Gallup's new report, the 2016 Global Great Jobs Report, offers the latest update on the real jobs situation in more than 130 countries. The report reveals where the good -- and great -- jobs are and where the greatest deficits remain.

Fifty-one percent of U.S. adults believe the job market in the city or area where they live is good for job seekers. Those employed full time and nonwhites are far more likely to think that now is a good time to find a good job.

Employee engagement among U.S. workers reached a new high in March, when an average of 34.1% were engaged. The previous high in Gallup's five-year trend was 33.8% in March 2011.

North Dakota (51.5%) had the highest Gallup Good Jobs rate and West Virginia (38.3%) the lowest in 2015. Labor market conditions are strongest in the northern Great Plains and Mountain states and near the nation's capital.

Gallup reviews its top world findings from 2015 based on surveys conducted in more than 140 countries through the Gallup World Poll.

by Jim Clifton

A philanthropic foundation aims to ignite desperately needed new business startups, which will create the good jobs that the world's citizens most want.