Jobs

By focusing on job creation through small-business startups, the EU can make its annual €21 billion bailout of unemployed young adults a success.

by Frank Newport

Americans are clearly focused on the economy, jobs and dysfunctional government as major problems facing the nation today. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump can do well to provide specifics on how they would address these issues.

Sixty-three percent of U.S. workers believe it is likely that they would find a job just as good as the one they have now if they were laid off. This percentage is back up to pre-recession levels after falling to 42% in 2010.

by Julie Ray

Gallup's new report, the 2016 Global Great Jobs Report, offers the latest update on the real jobs situation in more than 130 countries. The report reveals where the good -- and great -- jobs are and where the greatest deficits remain.

Fifty-one percent of U.S. adults believe the job market in the city or area where they live is good for job seekers. Those employed full time and nonwhites are far more likely to think that now is a good time to find a good job.

Employee engagement among U.S. workers reached a new high in March, when an average of 34.1% were engaged. The previous high in Gallup's five-year trend was 33.8% in March 2011.