Workplace

Millennials tend to shop around for the companies that offer what they want in a role and work environment.

Twenty percent of U.S. workers say they are making less money than they did five years ago, down from 28% in 2013. Also, 23% say their job does not take full advantage of their skills and training.

Leaders know that a company mission is important. But less than half of workers feel strongly connected to their company's purpose.

by Ben Ryan

Young women generally report more negative life experiences than young men worldwide. This gender gap disappears, however, as their life experiences improve with full-time jobs.

About four in 10 Americans (39%) in August say it is a good time to find a quality job, down slightly from 43% in July.

Engaging millennial employees dramatically decreases the likelihood that they will change companies.

The U.S. Gallup Good Jobs rate was 47.1% in July and unemployment was 5.1%, the best rates Gallup has recorded for each since 2010. Workforce participation was 67.8%, the highest since June 2013.

by Jim Clifton

Companies aren't growing. CEOs talk a big customer game and then go back to their offices, acquire their competitors and lower prices. Shockingly, boards of directors encourage this.

School districts can take concrete steps to create more brand ambassadors -- and engage more teachers.

School districts are missing out on engagement opportunities with current teachers who can influence new recruits and parents.

Key findings from Gallup's major study of companies that have implemented strengths-based management practices.

29% of local and state government workers are engaged in their jobs — 71% are not

by Jon Clifton, Managing Director, Global Analytics

The State of Local and State Government Workers' Engagement report shows a median of 29% of local and state government employees across the U.S. are engaged at work and provides a snapshot of the engagement situation in 43 states.

Millennials desire opportunities to learn and grow in their jobs -- but they're struggling to find ones they think are worthwhile.

Recognizing good work is a powerful, cost-effective method of improving organizational performance -- yet it is underused.