Workplace

A Gallup study proves the business benefits of strengths-based development for employees.

by Jim Clifton

Twenty-five million U.S. adults are invisible in media coverage of the widely reported 4.9% official unemployment rate.

A contradiction among millennials: This generation is extremely digitally connected, yet unattached to institutions and employers.

U.S. workers worry more about having their benefits reduced than about being laid off, getting a pay cut or having their hours cut. Fewer worry about each of these possibilities than did so from 2009-2013.

The Ritz-Carlton is a model for colleges and universities -- but not in the way you think.

Most new teachers are millennials. But few public school superintendents think their districts understand this generation's workplace needs.

Leaders need to engage millennials right now to seize a well-being opportunity for their organizations.

Americans have major problems with their well-being -- but millennials may help turn the tide.

Just 29% of millennials are engaged in their jobs. They'd be more committed if they received job clarity and were held accountable for their performance.

U.S. workers have become more satisfied with many aspects of their jobs, and are most positive about physical safety, relations with coworkers, flexibility and job security. Workers are least satisfied with stress and health benefits.

Millennials tend to shop around for the companies that offer what they want in a role and work environment.

Twenty percent of U.S. workers say they are making less money than they did five years ago, down from 28% in 2013. Also, 23% say their job does not take full advantage of their skills and training.

Leaders know that a company mission is important. But less than half of workers feel strongly connected to their company's purpose.

by Ben Ryan

Young women generally report more negative life experiences than young men worldwide. This gender gap disappears, however, as their life experiences improve with full-time jobs.

About four in 10 Americans (39%) in August say it is a good time to find a quality job, down slightly from 43% in July.

Engaging millennial employees dramatically decreases the likelihood that they will change companies.

The U.S. Gallup Good Jobs rate was 47.1% in July and unemployment was 5.1%, the best rates Gallup has recorded for each since 2010. Workforce participation was 67.8%, the highest since June 2013.