Workplace

No company can put a price tag on safety. Engaging employees and creating a culture focused on safety reduces accidents.

Millennials are the generation in the workplace most likely to look for and change jobs. What do they want from an employer?

Teams' structures are surging, replacing old hierarchies. But is more teamwork better? Not unless teams are managed the right way.

Millennials are the most likely generation to switch jobs. One possible reason: They're the least engaged employees in the U.S.

by Jim Clifton

Are millennials really that different? The answer is yes -- profoundly so. Millennials will change the world decisively more than any other generation, says Gallup's CEO.

A new Gallup report finds four themes collectively describe millennials: unattached, connected, unconstrained and idealistic.

Sixty-three percent of U.S. workers believe it is likely that they would find a job just as good as the one they have now if they were laid off. This percentage is back up to pre-recession levels after falling to 42% in 2010.

Across Most of the World, the Percentage of Adults With Great Jobs Rarely Tops 10%

by Julie Ray

Gallup's new report, the 2016 Global Great Jobs Report, offers the latest update on the real jobs situation in more than 130 countries. The report reveals where the good -- and great -- jobs are and where the greatest deficits remain.

Fifty-one percent of U.S. adults believe the job market in the city or area where they live is good for job seekers. Those employed full time and nonwhites are far more likely to think that now is a good time to find a good job.

Employee engagement among U.S. workers reached a new high in March, when an average of 34.1% were engaged. The previous high in Gallup's five-year trend was 33.8% in March 2011.

German management culture doesn't emphasize effective people management -- and the results show in low engagement nationwide.

Most German employees say performance appraisals don't meet the goal of actually improving their performance.

Workers who are not engaged or actively disengaged cost the German economy up to 287.1 billion euros annually in lost productivity.

Leaders can use several methods to influence employees and monitor risk.