Workplace

by Jim Clifton

A Gallup study of U.S. growth and productivity finds no economic recovery. The Great Recession may be over, but America is running on empty.

Strengths initiatives come to life when workers go beyond discovering their individual strengths and form strengths communities.

By studying top performers and developing analytical hiring processes, companies can keep their hiring biases in check.

The 43% of Americans who say it is a good time to find a quality job is generally in sync with what would be expected, based on current U.S. unemployment rates hovering near 5%.

All people have unconscious biases, and they affect hiring decisions. Companies need a systematic approach to talent recruitment.

Women are more engaged at work than men are -- and female managers are better at engaging employees.

Slightly more than a third of millennial workers say the mission of their organization makes them feel their job is important.

Many millennials move from job to job, but not all of them are prone to leave their employers.

No single explanation can account for the differences in men's and women's paychecks, but two reasons stand out.

Nearly six in 10 members of this generation say that work-life balance and well-being in a job are "very important."

Though less pronounced than in the past, the gender pay gap still exists and has barely budged in over a decade.

by Simon Cooper

Every employee is talented in some way. Discovering those strengths and fitting them to a job role improves companies and leadership.

When companies consistently talk about strengths concepts, employees use their strengths more often.

Organizations need to do more to make leadership a reality for women who have the talent and ambition to fill those roles.

Forty-two percent of Americans say now is a good time to find a quality job. Democrats are substantially more positive than Republicans about the job market.

Income is important, but women want more out of a job. They'll shop around for a role that best fits them and their lives.