Polling Matters

by V. Lance Tarrance

Newly elected Vice President Mike Pence may be in line to expand the duties and power of the office of vice president.

by Frank Newport

Find out which of President-elect Trump's proposals are in sync with American public opinion, which are not and which fall in the middle.

by Frank Newport

Hillary Clinton's margin over Donald Trump in the national popular vote will be close to two percentage points, making the 3.3-point Clinton margin in the pre-election national poll average remarkably accurate.

by Michael Smith and Frank Newport

Find out where Americans stand on four key issues that were on the ballot in several states: marijuana legalization, the death penalty, gun control and increasing the minimum wage.

by Frank Newport

Gallup's Editor-in-Chief reports on eight things we learned from the American people during the presidential campaign of 2016.

by V. Lance Tarrance

The U.S. system for electing presidents is controversial, unpopular and not well understood, but has stood as the law of the land since George Washington was elected in 1789.

by Dan Witters, Frank Newport and Lydia Saad

As the presidential campaign reaches the home stretch, terrorism and immigration for Donald Trump -- and race relations and the role of government for Hillary Clinton -- may be the highest return-on-investment areas for each to discuss.

by Frank Newport and Andrew Dugan

To a remarkable degree, Americans -- now and in the past -- think about "emails" when asked what they have heard or read about Hillary Clinton.

by Michael Smith and Frank Newport

Americans are generally happy with their own healthcare, more negative than positive about the Affordable Care Act and leery of federal involvement in running healthcare.

by Frank Newport and Riley Brands

Immigration policy has taken on new resonance in this presidential election cycle. Gallup reviews American public opinion on immigration, including what the public wants government to do going forward.

by Frank Newport and Andrew Dugan

Americans continue to be more likely to report having read, heard or seen something about Donald Trump than about Hillary Clinton. In recent days, 83% of Americans have heard something about Trump, 78% about Clinton.

A weekly update on Americans' recall of news about the two presidential candidates shows that Trump has clearly regained his position as more in the news than Clinton, fueled in large part by Americans' focus on his tax situation.

by Frank Newport and Andrew Dugan

Americans' recall of having read, seen or heard anything about Clinton and Trump jumped to record levels after the first debate, but there has been little meaningful change in the two candidates' images.

Americans' recollections of what they heard about Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump this week included many references to the New York and New Jersey bombings. By late in the week, references to Clinton in conjunction with the coming debate were frequent.

by Lance Tarrance

Presidential debates aren't always pivotal in campaigns, but they can be -- and they are always high theater. The elements are in place for 2016 to be one of those times the debates really matter.

by Frank Newport and Andrew Dugan

Record-low percentages of both Republicans and Democrats say there is a candidate running who would make a good president, but Republicans remain significantly more negative than Democrats.

by Frank Newport

Protestants are more likely to be positive about Trump than Clinton, while the reverse is true of Catholics, but these views differ significantly when these two groups are divided by race and ethnicity.

by Frank Newport

Despite rabid disagreements on many issues, the recent economic speeches by Trump and Clinton showed areas of agreement on economic policy, including several areas in which both candidates are in sync with American public opinion.

by V. Lance Tarrance

Unable to transform their images with voters, the 2016 presidential candidates will likely focus on vilifying their opponent in an unprecedented race to the bottom that could agitate voters enough to turbo-boost turnout.

by Frank Newport and Andrew Dugan

Hillary Clinton's favorable rating among 18- to 29-year-olds is well below her favorable rating among those who are older, which is a highly unusual situation for a Democratic political figure.