Polling Matters

by Frank Newport and Jim Harter

U.S. adults have well-defined images of the four major presidential candidates across 12 key leadership dimensions. They give the candidates, as a group, the most credit for being competitive, intense, focused and enthusiastic.

by Frank Newport

Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz have adopted strong, and opposing, positions on the ideal role of government. Americans support neither of these positions, and would prefer debate and compromise on the issue, rather than rigid ideology.

by Frank Newport and Lydia Saad

Despite some contentions to the contrary, evidence shows that at this time in the 1980 campaign year, Ronald Reagan's image was significantly more positive than Trump's image is now.

by Frank Newport

Hillary Clinton drops to her lowest net favorable rating among Democrats since Gallup began tracking her in July. Both Ted Cruz and Donald Trump return to near their all-time lows among Republicans.

by Frank Newport

Democrats are significantly more positive about their two leading presidential candidates than Republicans are about theirs. If this doesn't change, it could give Democrats an advantage in the fall election.

by Frank Newport

Americans see foreign trade positively when given an option between the views that importing is a negative and that exporting is a positive. Questions emphasizing only the effects of imports on jobs can produce more negative reactions.

by Frank Newport

Today, Gallup launched the Presidential Election 2016: Key Indicators page, combining a number of important measures that help provide context for this year's election.

by Frank Newport

Americans' reactions to the specific idea of a single-payer healthcare system tilt more positive than negative across a number of different ways of asking about it, but underlying support for the concept of a government-run healthcare system is still in the minority.

by Andrew Dugan and Frank Newport

Donald Trump is more unpopular than other major candidates with national adults, yet his image among Republicans is better than Cruz's. At times this year, Trump's image has matched Mitt Romney's image in the 2012 election.

by Andrew Dugan and Frank Newport

Hillary Clinton has reclaimed her role as the best-liked presidential candidate in Democrats' eyes, eclipsing Bernie Sanders.

by Frank Newport

Hillary Clinton has a more positive image among black Democrats than does Bernie Sanders, while Sanders is better-liked among white and Hispanic Democrats. Many blacks and Hispanics don't know enough about Sanders to rate him.

by Andrew Dugan

Gallup looks at how Americans viewed the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and the political stakes in naming a replacement.

by Frank Newport

Although politically very different, presidential candidates Ted Cruz and Bernie Sanders have both campaigned on the same contention that government in Washington is not working, something largely in tune with Americans' attitudes.

by Andrew Dugan

Long the underdog candidate in the Democratic presidential nomination contest, Democratic adults who know Bernie Sanders now like him better than Hillary Clinton. Sanders has a net favorable score of +53, compared with Clinton's +49.

by Frank Newport

Donald Trump currently receives a 60% unfavorable rating from Americans -- a higher unfavorable than any other candidate running, and higher than any major-party candidate in elections going back to 1992.

by Frank Newport

Ted Cruz's net favorable rating among Republicans has dropped from as positive as +48 less than a month ago to +32. Donald Trump's image is steadier, at +27.

by Andrew Dugan

Very conservative Republicans, a politically active bunch, view presidential candidates Ted Cruz, Ben Carson and Mike Huckabee the most positively. Cruz, though, is the only candidate whose image continues to improve with these Republicans.