Polling Matters

by Jonathan Rothwell

The relationship between economic hardship and favorable views of Donald Trump is not as neat as some commentators have suggested. Those who like Trump tend to live in areas far from the Mexican border that are relatively unexposed to trade competition.

by Lydia Saad

Melania Trump's pre-convention favorable rating is the worst of any potential first lady Gallup has measured since 1992, mainly because Democrats tilt strongly against her. Republicans are more positive, though many can't rate her.

by Frank Newport and Andrew Dugan

In the U.S., one in four view Trump and Clinton unfavorably, much higher than the percentage who disliked both candidates in 2012 or 2008. But this doesn't mean turnout will be low or a third-party candidate will be successful.

by Frank Newport

A review of Gallup data on Americans' attitudes toward police, race and criminal justice provides a public opinion context for the events of the last several days.

by Frank Newport

In dueling speeches this week, both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton talked about several of the key issues the public has identified as most important to them -- including the economy and jobs, infrastructure and the failure of the "system" to work as it should.

by Frank Newport

Most Americans would support new laws requiring universal background checks for gun purchases in the U.S. A majority also believe that more Americans owning and carrying guns would be effective in preventing situations like the Orlando mass shooting.

by Frank Newport

Before the Orlando shootings, Americans indicated that military actions against the Islamic State would be among the most effective ways to fight terrorism and that restrictions on Muslims would be among the least effective.

by Frank Newport

Americans are clearly focused on the economy, jobs and dysfunctional government as major problems facing the nation today. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump can do well to provide specifics on how they would address these issues.

by Frank Newport and Andrew Dugan

As Bernie Sanders finds himself under increased pressure from major Democratic figures to quit the presidential primary, he remains more popular among national Democrats than does Hillary Clinton.

by Frank Newport

Americans are significantly dissatisfied with the U.S. system of government, yet don't rate this as a high priority for the next president to address. Without addressing this major issue, however, the new president will have major problems executing his or her promised agenda.

by Frank Newport

Race, ethnicity, gender and marital status are among the most powerful demographic differentiators in views of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

by Frank Newport

The American public has not formed firm opinions on the issue of policies or laws surrounding transgender individuals' use of bathroom facilities, and the polling evidence that does exist at this point is mixed.

by Frank Newport

Despite an editorial emphasis on a "divided" Republican Party, the significant majority of rank-and-file Republicans like Donald Trump and say it's likely they will vote for him.

by Frank Newport

Ted Cruz's choice of Carly Fiorina as his running mate might help his ticket in a November matchup with Hillary Clinton, but the benefit it brings him in the primary is unclear. Cruz's current challenge is among men, not women.

by Frank Newport

Republicans' views of Ted Cruz are now at a new low, with 39% viewing him favorably and 45% unfavorably. This reflects a steep slide in his image over the last couple of weeks. Donald Trump's image is up to +24 among Republicans.

by Frank Newport and Jim Harter

Gallup research reveals leadership strengths most highly correlated with likelihood to vote for president are: inspiring, caring about individuals, visionary and courageous -- traits on which remaining candidates are rated poorly.

by Frank Newport and Jim Harter

U.S. adults have well-defined images of the four major presidential candidates across 12 key leadership dimensions. They give the candidates, as a group, the most credit for being competitive, intense, focused and enthusiastic.

by Frank Newport

Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz have adopted strong, and opposing, positions on the ideal role of government. Americans support neither of these positions, and would prefer debate and compromise on the issue, rather than rigid ideology.

by Frank Newport and Lydia Saad

Despite some contentions to the contrary, evidence shows that at this time in the 1980 campaign year, Ronald Reagan's image was significantly more positive than Trump's image is now.