Gallup Vault

Despite reservations about some specific spending cuts, the majority of Americans in 1981 endorsed Ronald Reagan's budget cutting plans and approved of his handling of the economy as he sought to remake the federal budget.

In 1954, most Americans thought that if J. Edgar Hoover were to say that the FBI had most of the American communists under its eye, they would feel pretty sure it was true.

Saturday marks 25 years since the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles. Americans at the time faulted both the riots and the verdict that sparked them.

Long before Amazon made shopping at big-box stores and malls seem old fashioned, "chain stores" were the disruptive force in American commerce.

Eight in 10 Americans said in 1999 that Columbine was not an isolated incident, but rather a sign that something was "seriously wrong" in the U.S.

President Harry Truman's dismissal of Gen. Douglas MacArthur in 1951 set off a firestorm of controversy.

Nine in 10 Americans familiar with John F. Kennedy's press conferences in 1962 liked how he handled himself. Only 36% said the press asked good questions.

Seven of the top 10 reasons Americans gave for the problem of teenage delinquency in 1954 had to do with bad parenting, especially lack of discipline.

In the years bracketing World War II, many Americans were willing to curb free speech for groups perceived to be undermining the U.S. government.

On the 70th anniversary of the Truman Doctrine, the Gallup Vault reviews Americans' reactions to this historic foreign policy shift.

Ronald Reagan's 1987 address on the Tower Commission report helped repair his job approval rating after the Iran-Contra affair.

President Nixon's February 1972 visit to China made Americans more optimistic about achieving world peace, helped transform Americans' opinion of the Chinese people and lifted Nixon's approval rating.

Gallup tracked the evolution of Americans' acceptance of unconventional clothing choices by women, starting with slacks.

A 1972 Gallup poll found football eclipsing baseball for the first time as Americans' favorite sport to watch.

In 1949, at a low point in business-labor relations, someone proposed that the two sides hear each other out over weekly luncheons.

Seventy-eight percent of Americans approved of Dwight Eisenhower's "interregnum" in 1953, similar to approval of the way several recent presidents-elect handled this transition period.

January marks 40 years from a record cold snap that brought unprecedented snow to Miami and created hardships for one in three Americans.

Americans in 1942 were nearly unanimous in saying they would allow a son of theirs, even one as young as 14, to have a paper route.

Eight years after his 1942 recording of "White Christmas" became a national sensation, one in three Americans named Bing Crosby their favorite male singer.

Long before credit cards became ubiquitous, 36% of Americans in 1941 said they were paying for something on "installment."