Gallup Vault

Seven of the top 10 reasons Americans gave for the problem of teenage delinquency in 1954 had to do with bad parenting, especially lack of discipline.

In the years bracketing World War II, many Americans were willing to curb free speech for groups perceived to be undermining the U.S. government.

On the 70th anniversary of the Truman Doctrine, the Gallup Vault reviews Americans' reactions to this historic foreign policy shift.

Ronald Reagan's 1987 address on the Tower Commission report helped repair his job approval rating after the Iran-Contra affair.

President Nixon's February 1972 visit to China made Americans more optimistic about achieving world peace, helped transform Americans' opinion of the Chinese people and lifted Nixon's approval rating.

Gallup tracked the evolution of Americans' acceptance of unconventional clothing choices by women, starting with slacks.

A 1972 Gallup poll found football eclipsing baseball for the first time as Americans' favorite sport to watch.

In 1949, at a low point in business-labor relations, someone proposed that the two sides hear each other out over weekly luncheons.

Seventy-eight percent of Americans approved of Dwight Eisenhower's "interregnum" in 1953, similar to approval of the way several recent presidents-elect handled this transition period.

January marks 40 years from a record cold snap that brought unprecedented snow to Miami and created hardships for one in three Americans.

Americans in 1942 were nearly unanimous in saying they would allow a son of theirs, even one as young as 14, to have a paper route.

Eight years after his 1942 recording of "White Christmas" became a national sensation, one in three Americans named Bing Crosby their favorite male singer.

Long before credit cards became ubiquitous, 36% of Americans in 1941 said they were paying for something on "installment."

Seventy-five years ago, Americans nearly unanimously supported the U.S. government's decision to declare war on Japan for its Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor.

A majority of Americans in 1939 were drawn to the ideas of "big businessmen" to help the country overcome the economic problems of the Great Depression.

The Iran-Contra affair, which kicked off on Nov. 25, 1986, sent Reagan's job approval -- but not his personal image -- into a tailspin.

After the Supreme Court ruled 60 years ago that segregated seating on city buses was illegal, six in 10 Americans approved of the decision, but 33% did not.

In 1975, Americans' image of the FBI was much less positive than 10 years earlier, following revelations about FBI surveillance practices.

In the late summer of 1946, Americans favored maintaining large peacetime forces in the Army and Navy, and most were theoretically willing to have a son serve to support them.

In 1941, most Americans opposed the poll taxes still in force in the South. But residents in the eight states where the laws persisted still favored them.