Leadership

Women have undoubtedly made progress in American society, but it is not enough. Women continue to drop out of the labor force.

Organizations with strengths-based brands draw talented job seekers who are driven to use and develop their innate abilities.

Struggles with indifferent B2B and banking customers were major business challenges Gallup.com covered in 2016.

What do women and millennials want from the workplace? Gallup.com covered these and other hot topics in 2016.

Has the U.S. economy really recovered? How many people worldwide have great jobs? Gallup.com tackled these and other questions in 2016.

On-the-ground coaches help leaders, managers and employees fully develop and apply their strengths.

Having a best friend at work links to business outcomes such as profitability, safety and customer loyalty, Gallup finds.

Rapid changes in the industry affect healthcare employees' expectations and connection with their organization's mission.

Parent engagement is vital for school success, yet only a third of parents have ever participated in parent surveys or research.

Unemployment can be particularly devastating for young adults in high-income countries.

Strengths initiatives come to life when workers go beyond discovering their individual strengths and form strengths communities.

Every employee is talented in some way. Discovering those strengths and fitting them to a job role improves companies and leadership.

When companies consistently talk about strengths concepts, employees use their strengths more often.

Organizations need to do more to make leadership a reality for women who have the talent and ambition to fill those roles.

Income is important, but women want more out of a job. They'll shop around for a role that best fits them and their lives.

Communities that invest in bike paths, parks, walkability and public transit have more success in key aspects of well-being.

One factor has the greatest influence on women's decision to stay in the workforce or leave: children.