Performance Management

Whether remote workers are actually engaged in their jobs depends on how much time they spend out of the office.

The trend of employees working remotely continues to grow and is on the upswing across many industries.

Finding out what workers want most in a job and an organization can help companies improve attraction and recruitment strategies.

What do workers want most in a job and a company? The answer can help companies improve attraction and recruitment strategies.

The more that employees believe the job market is opening up, the less likely they may be to stay in their current jobs.

The U.S. job market is a mixed picture for workers: Some find it bleak, while others are confident and ready to look for new jobs.

Changes affecting organizations are coming relentlessly. They're overlapping and colliding in ways they haven't before.

51% of employees are actively looking for a new job or watching for new job openings.

What do women and millennials want from the workplace? Gallup.com covered these and other hot topics in 2016.

Not every manager has the talent to be great -- but most managers can improve.

Teams with low engagement and poor managers are less productive, less profitable and less likely to be loyal.

Income is important, but women want more out of a job. They'll shop around for a role that best fits them and their lives.

When it comes to getting the most out of employees' strengths and unlocking their potential, managers play an essential role.

One factor has the greatest influence on women's decision to stay in the workforce or leave: children.

45% of female employees want to become a senior manager or leader

Employees across generations have a shared need for clear expectations in the workplace.

Just 29% of millennials are engaged in their jobs. They'd be more committed if they received job clarity and were held accountable for their performance.

Recognizing good work is a powerful, cost-effective method of improving organizational performance -- yet it is underused.

Millennials desire routine feedback from their supervisors, but they neither request nor receive it.

Gallup's latest meta-analysis on the relationship between team engagement and performance covers more than 82,000 teams globally.