Good Jobs

70% of women worldwide prefer to have paid jobs

by Jonathan Rothwell

Globalization has become a scapegoat for rising inequality and weak economic performance, but the evidence for this is weaker than commonly believed.

by Valerie J. Calderon and Jeffrey M. Jones

Most chief academic officers and provosts say their institution is focusing more on the ability of degree programs to help students get good jobs.

The 43% of Americans who say it is a good time to find a quality job is generally in sync with what would be expected, based on current U.S. unemployment rates hovering near 5%.

U.S. workers have become more satisfied with many aspects of their jobs, and are most positive about physical safety, relations with coworkers, flexibility and job security. Workers are least satisfied with stress and health benefits.

Twenty percent of U.S. workers say they are making less money than they did five years ago, down from 28% in 2013. Also, 23% say their job does not take full advantage of their skills and training.

About four in 10 Americans (39%) in August say it is a good time to find a quality job, down slightly from 43% in July.