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Fewer in U.S. Now See Bible as Literal Word of God

Coinciding with a general decline in religiosity in the U.S., a record-low 20% of Americans now say they believe the Bible is literally true.

Personal Religiosity and Attitudes Toward Abortion

Americans' personal religiosity is significantly related to their abortion attitudes, even after controlling for religious and political identity and other demographic variables.

Record Few Americans Believe Bible Is Literal Word of God

Fewer than one in four Americans (24%) say the Bible is the literal word of God. This is down slightly from 28% in 2014 and is the lowest in Gallup's four-decade trend.

Three in Four in U.S. Still See the Bible as Word of God

Three in four Americans consider the Bible to be God's word, with 28% saying it should be taken literally and 47% saying it is open to interpretation. Long-term biblical literalism has declined some, while a secular take on the Bible has become ...

Religion and Drinking Alcohol in the U.S.

Highly religious Americans are less likely than others to drink alcohol and are more likely to view drinking as morally unacceptable.

Religion, Race and Same-Sex Marriage

Support for legal same-sex marriage is strongly related to religion and partisanship. Black Americans, who tend to be Democratic and highly religious, are particularly cross-pressured on this issue.

Religion Takes Larger Role for Democrats This Year

The Democratic National Convention emphasized Biden's personal faith, while Republicans continued to focus on activating their core evangelical base.

In U.S., 3 in 10 Say They Take the Bible Literally

Three in 10 Americans view the Bible as the literal word of God, similar to what Gallup has measured in the past two decades but down from the 1970s and 1980s. Close to half, 49%, view the Bible as the inspired word of God, but do not believe ...

On Moral Issues, Not All Protestants Are Created Equal

Protestants who identify with "mainline" denominations are distinctly more liberal on moral issues than are Baptists, Pentecostals and those identifying with nondenominational Protestant groups.

Update: Evangelicals, Trump and the Election

The evangelical vote is a topic of high interest, but defining who evangelicals are and understanding their voting intentions present challenges.
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