Higher Education

by Valerie J. Calderon and Jeffrey M. Jones

Most chief academic officers and provosts say their institution is focusing more on the ability of degree programs to help students get good jobs.

Building innate talents into strengths in college or at work requires practice, much like building physical strength.

Struggles with indifferent B2B and banking customers were major business challenges Gallup.com covered in 2016.

by Brandon Busteed

Students and colleges could benefit from putting more emphasis on students' successful exit from -- rather than entrance into -- college in the form of effective career services.

16% of college graduates who visited their career services office report the office was very helpful.

by Valerie J. Calderon and Jeffrey M. Jones

Faculty members with online teaching experience are more confident in online learning outcomes than are faculty with only in-person teaching experience.

50% of U.S. Alumni Strongly Agree Their Education Was Worth the Cost

39% of Employed College Graduates Are Engaged At Work

by Brandon Busteed and Jonathan Rodkin

Postgraduate degree holders who took at least half of their classes online fare just as well on many employment and life satisfaction measures as those who took most courses in person.

College presidents say they value teaching and student service, but they are not incentivizing faculty to pursue these roles. "Publish or perish" is undermining student success and the mission of higher education.

The Ritz-Carlton is a model for colleges and universities -- but not in the way you think.

By emphasizing experiential learning and support before graduation, universities can potentially increase alumni attachment to their alma mater.

Opinions on issues facing higher education

Among 16 factors, U.S. college presidents rate student enrollment, job preparedness and student retention as most important for evaluating their own success; college ranking is least important.

Americans have lost track of the fundamentals of education. We measure grades and graduation rates, but are we measuring all of the things that we value? It's not all explained by test scores.