Gallup Daily

No updates March 28. Next update March 29.
Real Unemployment 9.4% +0.2
Gallup Good Jobs 44.4% -
Engaged at Work 32.2% -1.5
Economic Confidence 10 +1
Consumer Spending $101 +3
Trump Approval 43% +1
Updates daily at 1 p.m. ET; reflects one-day change

51% of employees are actively looking for a new job or watching for new job openings.

What do workers want most in a job and a company? The answer can help companies improve attraction and recruitment strategies.

Ronald Reagan's 1987 address on the Tower Commission report helped repair his job approval rating after the Iran-Contra affair.

Companies can recognize talent, but it's nearly impossible to maintain a flawless hiring record -- yet some businesses get close.

by Robert Bird and Frank Newport

Household income and education are strong predictors of Americans' views of what social class they are in, although the terms "lower class" and "upper class" are infrequently used regardless of income or education.

by Jonathan Rothwell

Globalization has become a scapegoat for rising inequality and weak economic performance, but the evidence for this is weaker than commonly believed.

The more that employees believe the job market is opening up, the less likely they may be to stay in their current jobs.

by Frank Newport

President Trump faces a highly polarized nation, as did Obama and Bush before him. How he can most effectively deal with this divided nation remains his biggest challenge.

The U.S. job market is a mixed picture for workers: Some find it bleak, while others are confident and ready to look for new jobs.

President Nixon's February 1972 visit to China made Americans more optimistic about achieving world peace, helped transform Americans' opinion of the Chinese people and lifted Nixon's approval rating.

Why is there a "talent shortage" when millions of Americans are looking for good jobs? It's time to change how companies hire.

by Jim Clifton

America needs to transform the practice of management, similar to the way Six Sigma and lean management disrupted processes in the 1980s.

45% of female employees want to become a senior manager or leader

Changes affecting organizations are coming relentlessly. They're overlapping and colliding in ways they haven't before.